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Enabling Others

Whether on a micro-level (a business) or on a macro-level (a government) the way to build value comes from a simple concept.  What can I/we do to enable the goals of others?  Growth and success come through service.

Balzac famously said, “Behind every great fortune lies a great crime.”  There’s only one problem behind this statement — it’s only true in crony  economies, where connections to siphon tax dollars matter more than meeting human needs.  It is false elsewhere.

I know there are some who will begrudge anyone the wealth that they have, because they are envious.  Envy is a bad guide to life and public policy.  If you want a poor society, encourage envy.  If you want a rich society, encourage service.

Division of labor is an amazing thing, and it aids the well-being of all.  I could see a business created that would aid rich people who are stretched for time, where many people would work for them, directly or indirectly, solving their needs.  That could employ a decent number of people, much like things were in the UK in the early 1800s, where the wealthy gentlemen, living off of rents from their lands, employed servants.  Those servants gained a better life, and so did the families of the gentlemen.  Was it perfect?  No, nothing is perfect aside from God, but when we help meet the goals of others, society improves, and the economy does as well.  It reduces unemployment.  People who work are far more happy than those that don’t work, even if the wages are small.  We were created to work, and it is no surprise that when we don’t have work, we tend to be sad.

Governments should think along these lines as well — what can we do to enable our people to work hard and produce valuable goods and services?  Some parts are easy:

  • A predictable legal structure
  • Regular enforcement — enforcement is not a surprise
  • Don’t be burdensome — government can’t solve every problem, so limit regulation to the most important aspects of society.
  • A tax structure that doesn’t change often, and reflects economics rather than politics.  Tax businesses and individuals on their increase in value on an accrual basis, and at a single rate.

These policies would free businesses to produce, while meeting the most important goals of society (don’t force pollution on others, etc.)

Personal Application

Do you want to be well-off?  Meet the needs of others, even if those needs are not well-known yet.

Mark Zuckerberg met the need of many people who want to share their lives with others via Facebook.  The same applies to Twitter and Instagram.

Bill Gates created the operating system of Apple Computers at a much lower price point, enabling many people to have a GUI that could not afford a Mac, even if it had a lot of bugs.

Samsung created a competitor to the iPhone at a much cheaper price point using Android, software free from Google.

People want to look thin, sexy, etc?  Provide shapewear for them a la Spanx.

The list could go on and on… there is a surfeit of human need, particularly on the low end of income, and those who meet those needs can do very well for their clients and themselves.

As for me

So what about me then?  Well, I don’t charge anything for anyone to read me.  I write this as a public service.  People can evaluate whether it is really to their benefit or not.

That said most of my clients started as readers of my blog.  What good do I do for my clients?  Several things:

  • I leave them free.  I don’t ask for all their assets, I don’t want to control all of their finances.
  • I free them from greed and panic.  let me adjust risk to market conditions, and we will do well.
  • Transparency.  My fee is my only income.
  • In general, my performance has exceeded the market in the past.  There is nothing that says it will be true in the future.
  • I’m not going to lie to clients or deceive them.  After all, 80%+ of my own liquid assets are on the line with them in the same proportion– clients get a clone of my portfolio.

My clients get peace of mind.  I am focused on improving my own wealth, and they travel along with me.  My interests are entirely aligned with theirs.

I do think that all of us should have an attitude of service toward others.  It makes for a better society, and better business practices.  Beyond that, Jesus said, “Do to others what you would have them do to you.”  Everyone wants good service, well, go deliver good service.  The world will be better, and you will be happier with your own life.  After all, no one is truly happy who cheats others in order to prosper.






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Ethics, Macroeconomics, public policy | RSS 2.0 |

One Response to Enabling Others

Disclaimer


David Merkel is an investment professional, and like every investment professional, he makes mistakes. David encourages you to do your own independent "due diligence" on any idea that he talks about, because he could be wrong. Nothing written here, at RealMoney, Wall Street All-Stars, or anywhere else David may write is an invitation to buy or sell any particular security; at most, David is handing out educated guesses as to what the markets may do. David is fond of saying, "The markets always find a new way to make a fool out of you," and so he encourages caution in investing. Risk control wins the game in the long run, not bold moves. Even the best strategies of the past fail, sometimes spectacularly, when you least expect it. David is not immune to that, so please understand that any past success of his will be probably be followed by failures.


Also, though David runs Aleph Investments, LLC, this blog is not a part of that business. This blog exists to educate investors, and give something back. It is not intended as advertisement for Aleph Investments; David is not soliciting business through it. When David, or a client of David's has an interest in a security mentioned, full disclosure will be given, as has been past practice for all that David does on the web. Disclosure is the breakfast of champions.


Additionally, David may occasionally write about accounting, actuarial, insurance, and tax topics, but nothing written here, at RealMoney, or anywhere else is meant to be formal "advice" in those areas. Consult a reputable professional in those areas to get personal, tailored advice that meets the specialized needs that David can have no knowledge of.

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