Category Archives: Best Articles

Post 2500: What is the Aleph Blog About?

Every hundred or so posts, I take a step back, and try to think about broader issues about blogging about finance.  Tonight, I want to explain to new readers what the Aleph Blog is about. There have been many new followers added to my blog recently,  through e-mail, RSS, and natively.  This is because of […]

Best of the Aleph Blog, Part 24

These articles appeared between November 2012 and January 2013: On Time Horizons Investment advice without a time horizon is not investment advice. This Election Will Solve Nothing So far that is true of the 2012 elections. NOTA Bene We need to add “None of the Above” as an electoral choice in all elections. Eliminating the […]

Best of the Aleph Blog, Part 23

Before I start this evening, I would like to explain some of the reasons for these “Best of the Aleph Blog” articles.  I write these no closer than one year after an article was written, so that I can have a more dispassionate assessment of how good they were.  I write these for the following […]

Best of the Aleph Blog, Part 22

These articles appeared between May 2012 and July 2012: On Distribution Formulas Most formulas for distributing income from an endowment or a a savings/investment fund are too liberal.  If you want the purchasing power to last, distribute less. Correlating Risky Assets How do correlations come into existence with risky assets.  This piece explains. Simple Stock […]

Best of the Aleph Blog, Part 18

These articles appeared between May and July 2011: Most People are not Better off Buying Common Stocks on their own versus Why Amateurs Should Invest in Common Stocks Yes, I wrote them both, but they complement each other.  Yes, most average people get skinned investing in common stocks, but if you apply yourself assiduously to […]

Best of the Aleph Blog, Part 17

These articles appeared between February and April 2011: On the Percentage of Market Cap held by Domestic Stock ETFs Implications Domestic stock ETFs tend to pick more volatile stocks. Domestic stock ETFs tend to pick stocks held by major institutions. Domestic stock ETFs tend to pick stocks less held by insiders.  (They tend to be […]